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Parkinson’s Disease and Oral Health Concerns

Parkinson´s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system which means that it is the type of disease that advances with time.

The most obvious and initial symptoms are related to movement such as shaking, rigidity, difficulty in walking, slow movements amongst others. Most cases occur after the age of fifty. Although the effects of this disease affect practically every area of life, today we will talk about how it affects oral health.

Parkinson’s disease can have a great impact in oral health, favoring the development of oral diseases due to the decrease in the frequency of swallowing saliva, causing it to accumulate in the mouth. This can have an impact on the quality of life of the patients.

According to Telma Rubinstein, Doctor of Dental Surgery at Prisma Dental, “Between 70 % and 80 % of people with Parkinson’s often accumulate excess saliva in the mouth , not because they secrete more, on the contrary, the production level of this fluid decreases but since they swallow less, it accumulates inside the mouth.”

People with Parkinson´s tend to have a greater amount of saliva in the mouth and drool constantly, this will not only impair their speaking but will also affect the process of chewing and swallowing. Some might develop more severe erosive lesions on the lips or facial skin.

Another condition that can be generated is bruxism or teeth grinding, which is produced unconsciously by the specific characteristics of Parkinson’s disease, leading to dental trauma and wearing out dental pieces.

The muscular rigidity that these patients present can also lead to complications in the jaw and joints, thus impairing the process of mastication and the probability of suffering muscular pain, headaches or migraines.

By: Prisma Dental

For any questions about our dental services you can contact us at clinic@prismadental.com or to our phone numbers: (506) 2291-5151 in Costa Rica or toll free at 866-741-8194 in United States.

Parkinson’s Disease And Oral Health Concerns
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